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Orkanan traditionals
03-06-2013, 02:36 PM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2013 02:52 PM by Pepijn.)
Post: #1
Orkanan traditionals
Let's publish some lyrics to traditional Orkanan chants and songs. They're translations of course, so their poetic value is very limited. But it gives some insight in the terminology used in Orkanan hymns. Just hope it makes sense.

"The hunt"
We are all looking, but we don't know what we're looking for
Sometimes you think "this is it" and then it turns out to be untrue
We are always looking: To hunt is better than to catch.

"Nobody dances alone"
Looking outside you will see
your neighbor's neighbors burning light
radiating through the night
lightning up the redwood tree

And listen, the music's eternal presence
Accompanied by the voices of yours
even when hiding behind the doors
they're sharing the stim's essence

Nobody dances alone
everybody needs someone
individually grown
collectively won


Ooh, I forgot this oldie. It's over 2500 years old, back from the days when Orkanan still had its roots in predecessor religions, the version called Fyrihuggun which marked the Orkanan realm of Stoldavia. It's still sung though, since it's about the creation myth...

Piled up high in the morning light, a giant silver sky
Waiting for the mind to land, materializing a dream
The light´s so bright but when eyes are closed
Colors fade and everything´s a fuzz
After a long winter´s day, another one in dark white
Piled up high the morning light, and everything
that seemed unreal has now turned into stone.

That's kinda poetic, although it needs some finetuning to get it rythmically correct...

VITTMARK:"This mess is a place." --- FISKS:"Fisk you!"
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04-29-2014, 05:57 PM
Post: #2
RE: Orkanan traditionals
It just takes a small crack
For Vind to make its entrance
And we start breathing anew
With winter changing its skin

We all have a desire
to the other side of the river
We want to start breathing anew
Wherever we're coming from
We will never make it to the other side
But that's all right

It's been a long day
In the dying parts of town
Where attack is the best defence
and the streets get overgrown
We all have walked there
up and down the same street
Through the times and through the thirst
through the sleeping blocks of rock

Just explain it when you know
about the things you want to acchieve
It's been a long day

I'm looking for paterns in the cobblestones
Sometimes I clearly see a system showing up
Sometimes I clearly see where to go
But sometimes I just see stones

It just takes a small crack
For the sun to make an entrance
And start breathing anew
With spring changing its skin

And when I lie down beside you tonight
Then tell me everything is all right
It's been a long day
It's been a long day

(Okay this is kind of clumsy looking at it from a rythmical POV, but english is just my third language and I simply don't have the skills to make it any better without spending ages on it. Maybe, when you can make a living from poetry, who knows... Wink )

VITTMARK:"This mess is a place." --- FISKS:"Fisk you!"
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05-09-2014, 02:22 PM
Post: #3
RE: Orkanan traditionals
Build Together
Congregationalist Work-Hymn

Let us pull
Pull together
The load is heavy
Our oxen weary
But we are many
And Vind is with us
Let us pull
Pull together

Let us push
Push together
The cart is heavy
The axle broken
But we are many
And Vind is with us
Let us push
Push together

Let us build
Build together
The toil is grinding
The work unending
But we are many
And Vind is with us
Let us build
Build together
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03-14-2015, 02:50 PM
Post: #4
RE: Orkanan traditionals
(This is not a raditional, actually, it's a contemporary "folk song" which is popular among freethinkers)

If you want to stay, then that's OK
But it doesn't mean a thing anyway
That freethinking guy, if that is what I seem
Then I will have to destroy it, that dream

Because you are from landowning breed
And while you say it's not something you need
You seem as freethinking as me
But what will our future together then be

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents own land
And mine don't

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents have horses
And mine don't

And now you want to come live with me
But your stim will certainly say no
We're not the combination that they like to see
So it might be better if you would just go

It's like your mother, who says "what are you doing to us"
Your mother, always sounding just so ridiculous
Nagging on about the education of your brothers
Which to me feels like something that smothers

And the your dad, never talking in a way that's pleasant
Because he thinks I'm just a stupid peasant.

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents own land
And mine don't

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents own horses
And mine don't

But watch out
You're not used to living from day to day
What it's like to be turned away
Our own house, that won't happen anyway
That's the treatment you'll get if you'll stay
And that's all there is to say.

So if you're ready for it then please return
But until then just split and burn

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents own land
And mine don't

Not good enough
Am I not good enough because your parents eat horses
And mine don't

VITTMARK:"This mess is a place." --- FISKS:"Fisk you!"
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08-11-2015, 11:02 AM
Post: #5
RE: Orkanan traditionals
A short fable this time. Fables of course play an important role in a naturalistic religion like Orkanan. With anthropomorphized main characters of course, and delivering some moral. Easy to remember, easy to tell each other.

This one is about the brother goats of Stolltallen. They were on their way through the forest towards the nearby market town of Vattstena, when they suddenly encounter a vicious wolf. He is clearly hungry and interested in some goat kebab. He offers the brothers a diabolical choice: one of them can continue without being harmed if he sacrifices his brother.

Now in some versions of this fable the wolf speaks with a Stoldish accent, but most of the time the wolf clearly has an Aedelish way of speaking, which gives the storyteller an opportunity to add some impersonation skills to the story.

Anyway, the oldest brother doesn't wait a second and charges towards the wolf, holding his neck tightly between his horns and a large tree. (FYI, Stolltallen means "large pine" in the east Hagenite dialect of the mining districts. There is no village called Stolltallen of course). The wolf is fighting and kicking vigorously and the goat knows that he won't be able to keep this wolf in his grip forever. He can feel the muscles in his neck starting to ache and those in his legs starting to shake. He wonders why his brother isn't helping him. The apparent betrayal of his brother gives him more strength to continue the uneven fight, he wants to stay alive to take revenge on his brother that took the easy way out and ran off.

The younger brother indeed ran away in panic, but quickly decides he needs to get some help. He gathers some oxes at the nearest farmstead and they hurry towards the large pine tree. They arrive just in time, when the older brother looses his grip on the wolf's neck. But the canine is no match for the immensely strong oxes and he quickly runs off when he gets the opportunity. Although some versions of the fable have the wolf squeezed like a bug against the large tree, depending on the average age of the audience, or the bloodthirst of the narrator. There are plenty of trees with red spots on it around to prove the validity of the story.

During the fight between the goat and the wolf, the goat has grown such a hatred towards his brother that he has to leave the family. He moves in with the oxes, but for some reason he never really fits in.

Moral? Never assume anything, but keep communicating. You're not the first to destroy a valuable blood band by failing to talk with each other.

VITTMARK:"This mess is a place." --- FISKS:"Fisk you!"
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12-01-2016, 10:35 PM
Post: #6
RE: Orkanan traditionals
A Veil of Protection

A lonely light shines amongst the Darkness,
A lonely beacon of Divine Understanding;
Vind is in this lonely light and it shines,
Able to overcome the Ignorance of the World.
A veil of protection amidst the Dark,
Hold the candle close and feel its warmth.


We cradle the flame for the comfort it brings,
And in reverence for the Knowledge it holds;
The light stays our wonderings unto Darkness,
And we return enlightened to the path of Light.
A veil of protection amidst the Dark,
Hold the candle close and feel its warmth.


The lonely light is a Heavenly solace,
Its beams cast shadows around the steadfast;
Vind the Brightest stands amongst us all,
In every spark and every ember.
A veil of protection amidst the Dark,
Hold the candle close and feel its warmth.


This hymn draws upon the metaphor of Light as Divine Knowledge and Darkness as the world of Ignorance outside of Vind's Master-plan. The candle is a frequently used motif (at least in Peratolianism) that signifies the holder's unflinching faith in the Plan and the importance of holding to it (for fear of straying into darkness and ignorance). It also symbolises the fragility of humanity's grasp of the Plan, as the flame could easily go out - faith in the Plan is what keeps the candle burning. Peratolian (or general Orkanan) services are often bathed in the light of individual candles to signify the congregation's commitment to the Plan and acceptance of the divine Knowledge Vind provides humanity; the light is self-consciously seen as a comfort amidst the darkness that surrounds the congregation.

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12-02-2016, 02:57 PM
Post: #7
RE: Orkanan traditionals
Vind of the Divine Creation

O Vind of the Divine Creation,
O bless us as we pray,
Provide for our Sacred Nation,
On this and every day.
While from Sky and Plain alike,
With joyous hearts and song,
We do gather from thy Wisdom
Knowledge ere past along.

O Vind of the Divine Creation,
Do not let us delay,
Succour all within this Nation,
On this and every day.
Wonder doth provide the Seas,
The Ship of State does provide for,
All within her wooden keel,
And those who lay beside the Shore.

O Vind of the Divine Creation,
Let us hear what you say,
Be Guide to our ancient Nation,
On this and every day.
The trees and plants do share,
Your Majestic vision above,
And we on Gotha do take heed,
And dutifully fall in Love.

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09-26-2019, 08:36 PM
Post: #8
RE: Orkanan traditionals
Onwards children, the joy of Vind is an Orkanan interventionist hymn popular in Anisora (recently featured in the Brothers of Mercy storyline).

Onwards children, the joy of Vind,
Your pilgrimage has only just begun;
What role will you play, the stim asks?
What happiness will you bring?

The world and Vind are new to you,
Their wonders yet to be seen.
Let us raise our voices in hopeful thanks,
For the Master Plan is richer with thee.

We take this journey together, children,
For you do not yet know the Way.
But soon you shall and by your light
Will guide your own children someday.

Onwards children, the joy of Vind,
Your pilgrimage has only just begun;
We stand with pride together now,
Fulfilling the Master Plan as one.

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