Gotha date; RH

 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
09-11-2017, 09:57 PM
Post: #1
Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
There's a lot of small details here so please read all of it to understand. Like always, apologies for any spelling mistakes.

The Amajin nation, colloquially referred to as the Deyanesir, is a rather fluid entity. Most experts have come to regard it as an ethno-cultural nationality which shares certain religious, linguistic and ancestral connections across a wide and variable group of people. Legend say that the earliest Amajin draw their origins from the Ancient Dayikan of Nehera which was an Amazon Queendom that expanded across Central Davai in ancient times. Following the violent Loura expansions the Amajin, who had established a prominent presence along the trade routes of Raia and Davai, spilled beyond the steppe in all directions but mostly west and south. This is a breakdown of the three main Amajin subgroups and their interactions with other ethnicities that have had an extensive impact of their contemporary character.

Rojavi (est. 70-75% worldwide)

The Rojavi Amajin are the most numerous of all the Amajin subgroups and form the majority of Amajin living in West Davai and populating the Amajin Republic which occupies the north-western Kisaga Peninsula. 'Rojavi' in the Amajin languages translates as 'Westerners' and directly links them to the sizeable westward migrations from the steppes of Central Davai, through The Breach and into West Davai, an event called the 'Rewiyek Rojavaye' – Journey West. They are the group who are large credited with some of the most notable achievements in Amajin history, including the Battle of the Breach, the conquests of Seyran Kabar and the settlement of Kisaga and subsequent sovereign Republic located there.

Today due to their intermixing with the other native groups of their new homeland the Rojavi share most of the phenotypical traits of a West Davaian people including the epicanthic fold and neotenised features. In particular there has been a high degree of integration with the Peduan people, native to southern and western regions of Kisaga. When the Rojavi conquered Kisaga during the time of Empress Seyran the new overlords of the region divided their Penduan subjects into two main castes. The 'higher caste' were local aristocracy and bannermen while the 'lower caste' were mainly peasantry and labourers. The High Penduan were considered eligible for integration with Rojavi and with the accelerating effects of the line marriage and the incentive for High Penduan to marry into Rojavi clans, they became more 'Amajinised' over the centuries and culturally adopt many customs of the Amajin and their language, which being Druminic, is exotic to the region. Nowadays the indigenous Penduan culture is associated with the Lower Peduan and obscured from the mainstream of Kisaga high society.

A visual comparison of a typical Rojavi and a Penduan they are quite similar. Notable differences include slightly greater average height of the Rojavi though this could more be due to differences in levels of nutrition between the two groups. Rojavi with a higher proportion of non-Penduan ancestry can occasionally express more recessive traits for example rounder eyes, longer noses and even a fair hair colour and complexion. In fringe sections of the upper class among whom beliefs in blood purity have taken hold and miscegenation is frowned upon, a small percentage of redheads are known to exist. Also the intermixing between relatively pure Rojavi and Samzayids living in Ameratsu and Shilyak Mo has lead to blond hair being dominant in these northern regions among the Rojavi living there.

In terms of religion the Rojavi stand out among the peoples of West Davai in that they are more conventionally religious as opposed to being informal adherents to Shuocianism. Most Rojavi like other Amajin groups follow the folk religion of Ster Atar which is monotheistic and worships a creator god named Atar, drawing closer similarities to the faiths of the Central Davaian Steppe from where the Amajin hailed. Atar is said to be guardian of a higher plane into which the souls of this world will pass after death provided they live to ethics worthy of heaven. Other religious customs mirror those of their West Davaian neighbours more closely including the veneration of ancestors, philosophers and nature.

Basuri (est. 20-25% worldwide)

The Basuri Amajin are descended from those who during the Amajin exodus from Central Davai were forced to travel south through Bulan and the Shenfur Pass to Khalil. They are a smaller community than the Rojavi and did not establish a homeland of their own in Raia but lived as a minority of tradesmen and merchants in the various states of the Phasian Sea Region, plying a living along the trade routes dominated by the Ithrieni Empire. Due to their exotic origins and threat to established monopolies the Basuri would occasionally experience persecution from governments of the region. To greater integrate with their overlords the Basuri would make concessions such as conversion to the Anur religion, not hugely different in form to Atarism and intermarriage with Phasian groups. With the establishment of the Amajin Republic in Northwest Davai, many Basuri have emigrated to the country and form a notable minority (8-12%).

Phenotypically the Basuri appear very distinct from the Rojavi and other peoples of Northwest Davai. Since most Basuri have only arrived in Kisaga during the last couple of generations they have not integrated to great enough extent to ware off they're Raian appearance. They are typically have dark hair and eyes and a darker skin hue which clearly looks brown or olive rather than pale or yellow. They also lack the characteristic eye folds of the region. They are essentially the poster-children of the multicultural modern Amajin Republic and mostly inhabit the more cosmopolitan areas of the country. They are credited with bring many of the new ideas of industrialisation to the country and Basuri clans have made a significant on the economic life of the Republic. Due possibly to their success and likely their distinct appearance some of the other communities within Kisaga view the Basuri with suspicion and some more radical 'purists' among the Rojavi question their claims to Amajin identity.

Culturally the Basuri have inherited much of the ancient Amajin culture and preserved a large collection of classical Amajin works and religious texts which have found their way into the museums and libraries of the Republic. Religiously the Basuri are split between Atarists who continue to practise the folk religion of the Amajin and Anurists who mostly settled Ithrien before migrating to Kisaga.

Laskari (est. Uncertain)

The Laskari Amajin are a relatively small minority of all Amajin and largely represent the Amajin who did not leave Central Davai during the exodus period. As such most are thought to live under the dominion of The Shadow and as such knowledge and statistical data on the Laskari is limited. Some are thought to be indentured labourers working under Loura overlords, other free Laskari may be living in the isolated communities located in defensible areas of the Laskarham Valleys, Crescent Mountains and Bulan. Recently a trickle of Laskari have been leaving Central Davai in increasing numbers, usually into Raia before some migrate to the Amajin Republic.

Due to the Laskari essentially being a genetic time capsule from an era before the expulsions, a typical Laskari is not hard to spot in the Republic. Ginger hair, pale skin and even green eyes are regular occurrences among pure-blood Laskari. Ethnologists believe that the Laskari represent the last living descendants of a proto-Anarian race living in Davai and Amajin 'blood purists' seem to have had their preconceived notions on Amajin genealogy validated. The most common reason given for individual Laskari immigrating into the Republic is marriage as they are highly sought after as spouses and their presence in line marriages with Rojavi redheads may preserve their ginger genes further into the future as well as increase the gene pool of the purist community to a healthy size. Despite all the furore over them, the Laskari still make up a rather small percentage of the Republic's population (est. <3%). In the cities it may seem more however because the signature Laskari red hair is emulated often by other Amajin either out of stylistic preference or to attract more favourable attention.

Like other Amajin, the Laskari predominantly follow the Atarist religion and speak Amajin languages though many of their dialects sound very different from Rojavi or Basuri dialects. For the size of the community, the Laskari also have greater linguistic diversity than the diasporic groups and account for most of the distinct Amajin Languages. The Laskari interpretations of the Atarist religion observably retain some archaic rites and practices that have otherwise been lost, though now these interpretations have experienced a revival. Also traces of very ancient Amajin polytheistic paganism have been reported to still be practised among a few Laskari tribes.

To Conclude

Ethnically the Rojavi and Basuri have largely adopted the phenotypes typical of their historical destinations and accommodated native influences in their places of settlement. They are to be considered worldly peoples because circumstances forced them to be so. Rojavi would appear derived from the Penduan and Samzayids and Basuri would be a trans-ethnic amalgamation of several Phasian ethnicities including the Teremani, Kachal, Gahnam and Janta. What makes them identify as Amajin, however, is their cultural inheritance from their fore-bearers, their language, religious beliefs, clan structure and matrilineality. The Laskari too are bound to the Amajin nation by the same broad cultural attributes while also retaining the distinctive features of the earliest Amajin who rode out on the steppe all those centuries ago.

Request

To make things easier I will formally request the Ancient Amajin be a distinct ethnic group of their own that would be the Gotha analogue to RW Tocharians. They would possibly be in a Proto-Anarian category of their own though I'm not overly concerned about being specific, the mystery would be good for the lore.

To back up my request I would like to address the point that the Drumini language family of the Laskarham Region where the Amajin originate is an analogue to the Indo-Aryan Languages and therefore will share a common origin with the Anarian language families. How would this have come to be? Maybe before waves of dark-haired peoples took over most of Davai it was home to a more ancient proto-Anarian wave of peoples and this linguistic connection is their legacy. I'll let you think on it.
Quote
09-13-2017, 05:42 PM (This post was last modified: 09-13-2017 05:43 PM by TeamBattleaxe.)
Post: #2
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
I've done a fleshed out outline of my proposed ethnic group. I've called them the Lasker people and they are intended as a Gotha's own Tocharians, descended from the first modern humans to migrate into Central Davai from Tharna at least 60,000 years BP. They have a common ancestor with Anario-Jorven and Yaemic peoples. They're closest ethnic cousins are the Dali and Ouzko who became intermixed at an early stage with a second migration from Raia brought darker phenotypes into the region. The Lasker however inhabited more isolated regions north of Laskerham and retained more of the first migration's mutations including a fairer complexion at least until the Amajin expansions.

The genetic history of the Lasker is elaborated using the migration map:
[Image: dGk5Ur1.png?1]

Here is how people with predominantly Lasker genetics would look:
[Image: eVbUlNW.png]

Phenotypes:
[Image: sF7iHat.png]

Let me assure you that this reflects the communities of Amajin living in Central Davai still and not the Rojavi of Northwest Davai who would appear more Mongoloid in line with their location.

Are we open to this idea? We have people living in the RW who prove that this is viable. In the Lasker portraits the man is a Kalish living in Pakistan while the woman is a Uyghur living in China.
Quote
09-13-2017, 08:42 PM
Post: #3
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
If Rojavi are the 70% of the population of the Amajin Republic then they would be the same as the Peduan. Why not just call them Peduan?

The Basuri are Laskari that have intermixed with the Peduan. Right?

(09-11-2017 09:57 PM)TeamBattleaxe Wrote:  To make things easier I will formally request the Ancient Amajin be a distinct ethnic group of their own that would be the Gotha analogue to RW Tocharians. They would possibly be in a Proto-Anarian category of their own though I'm not overly concerned about being specific, the mystery would be good for the lore.

Rather than create a new ethnic group, I think you should take an extant ethnic group that is the closest match to the Laskari and make them a sub-group of that ethnicity. I do not think you will find success in trying to convince the admins to allow a new ethnic group.

Quote
09-13-2017, 08:44 PM
Post: #4
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
Neoteny in humans sent me down a good 40 minute rabbit hole. Thanks for that. Tongue

Quote
09-13-2017, 09:30 PM (This post was last modified: 09-13-2017 10:13 PM by TeamBattleaxe.)
Post: #5
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
I've put all the good stuff on here:

http://www.worldofgotha.com/wiki/index.p...jin_Nation

Quote:If Rojavi are the 70% of the population of the Amajin Republic then they would be the same as the Peduan. Why not just call them Peduan?

No I'm changing that. For starters the Penduan are divided into two castes, one is a higher caste that over time integrate with the Rojavi and a lower caste that are kept separate. The Rojavi and Penduan will not have a clear dividing point but will be in a genetic continuum. They'll be a small minority of 'pure' Rojavi who will look almost Caucasian and large numbers of other Rojavi who would require the 'Dairy Test' to tell them apart from Penduan.

And you learn something new everyday!
Quote:The Basuri are Laskari that have intermixed with the Peduan. Right?

The Basuri went another route entirely, south into Raia and migrated to the Republic during the modern era. They are a bit like the Amajin equivalent of the Beta Israel. They share a culture and language with other Amajin.

Quote:Rather than create a new ethnic group, I think you should take an extant ethnic group that is the closest match to the Laskari and make them a sub-group of that ethnicity. I do not think you will find success in trying to convince the admins to allow a new ethnic group.

I was told that new ethnic groups could be set up with admin approval. I'm making the attempt and a putting out a case that's all.

And you learn something new everyday!
Quote
09-14-2017, 11:24 PM
Post: #6
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
It seems the Ouzko and/or Dali groups could be related to the Lasker. Perhaps they all sprung from an earlier group from central davai, and Lasker traits have changed somewhat
Quote
09-15-2017, 12:28 AM
Post: #7
RE: Ethnic Identity of the Amajin
(09-14-2017 11:24 PM)Brian von Gotha Wrote:  It seems the Ouzko and/or Dali groups could be related to the Lasker. Perhaps they all sprung from an earlier group from central davai, and Lasker traits have changed somewhat

I'm glad you're considering it. My thoughts were that the fair traits seen in Anarian people could have originated from a Davaian population that was isolated at a relatively northern latitude for thousands of years. The migration map and the regional geography seem to validate this scenario.

The little yellow arrows springing south of the large node represent the Ouzko and Dali I'm presuming. I'm proposing when they moved to their positions they were fairer peoples that intermixed with a later migration of darker people and hence they inherited their present appearance. The Lasker were relatively isolated until much later when they expanded beyond their mountainous home and so fairer traits persist.

Also the Amajin practice open line marriages so I'm guessing that mutual couplings that allow recessive traits to be passed on are given a greater chance to occur than under a nuclear family system. Would that be correct?
Quote


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)